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Reliable, local plasterers in Liverpool

Hello 🏡🏠🏘

I just wanted to post a quick review and thanks to a great local plastering company Liverpool Plastering and Rendering, who recently plastered my hall, stairs and landing at short notice after I was let down by another firm.

The lads did a great job, they left no mess, were reliable and totally transformed how the house looks!

If you are looking for Plasterers Liverpool or rendering in Liverpool I would highly recommend Liverpool Plastering & Rendering.

Here are some links to their website liverpoolplasteringandrendering.co.uk, their Twitter and Facebook page.

 

Jen

Xxx

 

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Crates and Ribbons

Shame can arguably be said to be one of the worst emotions out there. Emotions like fear, grief and jealousy are strong contenders, and yet these feelings, strong as they are, don’t quite work in the same way that shame does. Dr Mary C. Lamia, a clinical psychologist, positions shame as unique in that it “lead[s] you to feel as if your whole self is flawed”, eating away at your sense of self-worth until you can no longer bear to face public scrutiny, or indeed, yourself.

Beautiful without makeup

Given the deep-reaching effects of shame, it is not surprising, then, that it makes a remarkably effective tool for maintaining the patriarchal order. Women are shamed for a whole host of reasons— for being fat, being ugly, being hairy, being an airhead, being sexually promiscuous, being sexually conservative—the list goes on. Men are shamed when they behave too much like women—when they show…

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Amy Simone Design

I have recently come across a Burger King campaign that i am completely and utterly disgraced at;

Once again we can see that this set of advertisements is aimed directly at men. Many of us would have the most obvious question shouting at us right now, what on earth has sex got to do with selling a burger? Repeatedly the female form is used to present sexual poses to attract a male’s attention. We don’t even have to read the teaser phrases which are printed with the pictures. However, I can’t help but be shocked that ‘It’ll blow your mind away’, ‘It just tastes better’ and ‘She’ll tell you size doesn’t matter, she’s lying‘ could even be acceptable. This is a tremendous play on words like never before.

One huge matter that I find very disturbing is that its not only adult males who will see these…

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Female Interpretations of Sexual Content in the Music Videos of Popular Female Artists

Undergraduate Dissertation Introduction

Here is my undergraduate dissertation ‘Introduction’. It is a bit dodgy in areas but I hope that this will provide an example and help those who are undertaking research in a similar area.

Introduction

The debate surrounding the effects of sexual media has recently been reinvigorated with children and women’s charities, journalists and the current British and Australian governments, having all made attempts to address and tackle the sexual behaviours and attitudes expressed by female artists in their music videos and live performances. This renewed interest has mainly emerged due to the sexually provocative nature of current female artists such as Rihanna, whose notoriously raunchy performances frequently attract the attention of media critics, and Lady Gaga who has a reputation for wearing outrageous ensembles, often leaving very little to the imagination.

With a large majority of music being centred around relationships, romance and love, sex has always been a popular accompaniment to musical performance, lyrics and most recently, music videos. Early 20th century jazz and blues was recognised as exhibiting a certain level of sexual intensity with the gyrating crotch of Elvis, Little Richard and other rock and roll stars during the 1950s and 60s causing great controversy at the time (Arnett, 2002). Elvis was actually quoted in the 1970s as saying “Man, I was tame compared to what they do now. Are you kidding? I didn’t do anything but just jiggle” http://www.elvis.com. This quote emphasizes the percieved increase in the sexual nature of music from Elvis’ heyday in the 1950s through to the early 1970s.

During the 1980s and 1990s, sexual content had begun to increasingly permeate popular music (Roberts & Christenson, 1998) and can be seen and heard in the music lyrics and videos of female artists who enjoyed stardom at the time, most notabley Madonna, who in 1992 released the album Erotica along with a coffee table book entitled Sex which featured explicit photographs of the singer. Much tamer but still offering music fans scenes of a sexual nature, Britney Spears and Christina Aquilera have contributed to the array of provocative music videos with Christina’s Dirty video and Britney’s I’m a Slave for you consequently causing their own controversies. More recently during the 2000s and up to the present day, videos from artists such as the Pussycat Dolls, Shakira, Ciara, Beyonce, Lady Gaga and Rihanna have all continued the trend (Jhally, 2007).

The majority of research focusing on sexual content of music videos can be divided into three categories: content analyses, effects research and audience interpretations. This dissertation falls into the third and least developed field of research by exploring female audience interpretations of sexual content in female music videos.

As a major source of information for young people and adolescents, the mass media is believed to play a crucial role in their sexual socialisation (Harris & Scott, 2002). The presence of sexual content in music video is so pervasive within popular music that it has now reached the point where it is highly predictable for sexual imagery to accompany the music videos of popular female artists, even when the lyrics do not match the imagery (Roberts & Christenson, 1998). For example, a recent music video by British pop artist Pixie Lott shows the singer in a variety of sexual poses despite the song having nothing to do with sex. This raises serious concerns regarding the effects sexual content may have on viewers, especially young people, who are a significant concern due to the amount of time they spend listening to music and watching music videos (Arnett, 2002).

Supporting the argument that sex is becoming an increasingly pervasive part of mass culture, this dissertation aims to fill a void within existing research whereby it fails to adequately address the interpretations, perceptions and attitudes of young women in relation to the sexual content of music videos.

The main aim of the research is to utilise the focus group technique in order to discover what young women think about music videos and their sexual content. Participants were selected through snowball sampling and are young women aged 18-25. Questions focus on the areas of body image, sexual objectification, self-objectification and sexualisation of young people. The aim is to discover how the participants interpret what they see, how it makes them feel about their body image, their relationships with men, sexual objectification and whether or not they think sexual music videos by female artists impact young girls in a detrimental way.

Sexualising Student Culture

Links to recent articles from The Independant addressing the sexualised culture surrounding students and freshers week:

‘Slut dropping’ and ‘Pimps and Hoes’- the sexual politics of freshers’ week

We’re students, not slags

I came across these articles coincidently after a conversation with a collegue at university in which we discussed the sexual themes surrounding freshers week and student nights. I was outraged as my collegue told me about a local bar displaying a slogan reading “Grab yourself a slutty fresher”. The bar which is called ‘Bumper’ and based in Liverpool city centre, is apparently investigating the issue after a number of complaints from the public. Hopefully I will hear more about this soon and be able to provide an update.